Why did Athens lose the war?

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Why did Athens lose the war?

In 430 BC an outbreak of a plague hit Athens. The plague ravaged the densely packed city, and in the long run, was a significant cause of its final defeat. The plague wiped out over 30,000 citizens, sailors and soldiers, including Pericles and his sons. Roughly one-third to two-thirds of the Athenian population died.

Q. Why was Athens built?

The myth is symbolic but the two Gods symbolising the strength of Athens as a city of wisdom and as a sea power. The first settlement of Athens 3000 BC was situated on the rock of Acropolis. According to the tradition, Athens was founded, when the king Theseus united in a state several settlements of Attica.

Q. Why is Athens famous?

Athens, Modern Greek Athínai, Ancient Greek Athēnai, historic city and capital of Greece. Many of Classical civilization’s intellectual and artistic ideas originated there, and the city is generally considered to be the birthplace of Western civilization.

Q. How did ancient Athens fall?

In 338 BC the armies of Philip II defeated Athens at the Battle of Chaeronea, effectively limiting Athenian independence.

Q. Who was the first Persian king to attack Greece?

king Darius the Great

Q. How were slaves treated in Greece?

Slaves in ancient Greece were treated based on the kind of job they did, and also on the personality of their owners. If the owner was kind, he treated them decently. They also had different levels of independence based on the class they belonged to.

Q. What percentage of ancient Greece were slaves?

30 and 40 percent

Q. Why was Athens so important in ancient Greece?

Athens was the largest and most influential of the Greek city-states. It had many fine buildings and was named after Athena, the goddess of wisdom and warfare. The Athenians invented democracy, a new type of government where every citizen could vote on important issues, such as whether or not to declare war.

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